About Martinus and his works

Martinus (1890-1981) was a Danish spiritual writer. Having grown up in a small village in Denmark with limited schooling, he had an unexpected, profound spiritual experience at the age of 30, which transformed his consciousness. He spent the rest of his life writing down his analyses of life and the universe. His main work is called Livets Bog (The Book of Life) and consists of seven volumes. He also wrote numerous smaller books and article and drew 100 symbols symbolising the main laws and principles of the universe and the living being. During his lifetime he also gave a large number of lectures.

His works are collectively entitled The Third Testament. The connection to the development of Christianity and other world religions, and to the message of neighbourly love proclaimed by Jesus Christ, is a vital aspect of his works. He also describes his analyses as “intellectualised Christianity” or “cosmic communism”.

Read his works: 

His works are available in English online on the Martinus Institute’s website: Martinus’ texts

Here you can also find his symbols (published in The Eternal World Picture) and short descriptions of their explanations: Martinus’ symbols

In his works, Martinus presents a comprehensive world picture, an analysis of life and the universe. He describes that the laws of the existence are based on complete logic and that the keynote of the universe is love. He also called his world picture his cosmology. A central aspect of Martinus’ cosmology is the fact that life is eternal and that everything in the universe is alive  –not only people, animals, plants, minerals but also innumerable other life forms in other areas of existence – and that all these living beings are part of a living universe. Behind everything, there is an eternal, all-loving God. Martinus writes that the human being’s consciousness and morals are developed through reincarnation and karma, according to logical, natural laws. Via this link you can find an 8-page introduction to Martinus Cosmology, published by the Martinus Institute in Copenhagen:  Introduction to Martinus Cosmology

Photo from Martinus’ flat in the Martinus Institute, Copenhagen

Martinus’ works were written as freely available resources for everyone who is interested in spiritual matters. He explicitly did not wish that any closed associations or any form of membership should be created on the basis of his cosmic analyses. For those who are interested in learning more about Martinus and his works, there is extensive information on the Martinus Institute’s website: The Martinus Institute

His works are published by the Martinus Institute. The books can be bought online in their bookshop: Bookshop